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Beatrice's dream: a story of Kibera slum

Beatrice's dream: a story of Kibera slum

Williams, Karen Lynn; Stone, Wendy

This is a powerful photographic account of a child's life in the Kibera district of Nairobi, Kenya, written by an award-winning author and acclaimed photographer

Hardback, Book. English.
Published London: Frances Lincoln Children's, 2011
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Details

Statement of responsibility: Karen Lynn Williams ; photographs by Wendy Stone
ISBN: 184780019X, 9781847800190
Intended audience: Juvenile.
Physical Description: [25] p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Subject: Slums Kenya Kibera Juvenile literature.; Poor Kenya Kibera Juvenile literature.; Schools Kenya Kibera Juvenile literature.; Non-Fiction 7+.; Orphans Kenya Kibera Juvenile literature.; Kibera (Kenya) Social conditions Juvenile literature.; People and Places.

Accelerated Reading

Book Level: 4.2
Interest Level: LY
Points: 0.5
Quiz Number: 220862

Author note

KAREN LYNN WILLIAMS is the author of over a dozen books for children, including Galimoto, a Reading Rainbow Featured Book and one of the New York Times Top Ten Books of the Year. She was a Peace Corps volunteer in Malawi, Africa, which is the setting for When Africa Was Home, a Booklist Editors' Choice. She currently teaches creative writing and travel writing and works as a volunteer with refugee families. She has four children scattered around the world and lives with her husband Steven in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
WENDY STONE was raised in New York City, where she trained in photography and graphic design and worked for 13 years as a graphic designer. Her career as a photographer began when she was assigned by UNICEF to photograph their projects around the south-west Pacific. Since then she has travelled to many African countries on assignment for UN agencies, magazines and newspapers. She settled in Nairobi, Kenya in 1988 with her husband and daughter.

Description

Beatrice is a thirteen-year-old orphan in Kibera, Nairobi - a Kenyan shantytown built on refuse and rubbish and one of the biggest slums in Africa. In this book she describes her life: her walk to school, the dust that blows between her teeth and the mud she wades through, her teacher's down-to-earth encouragement, her fear of being alone, how safe she feels at school...

This sensitive account in words and photographs reveals the realities of life for some of the world's most deprived people - and offers hope as Beatrice follows her dream.



About Kibera slum



Kibera is in Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya, in east Africa. It is one of the largest slums in the world with over half a million people living there – about a quarter of the population of Nairobi. The slum covers 2.5 square kilometres (630 acres). There are no roads and few of the residents have modern toilets, clean drinking water or electricity. The crime rate is high and disease spreads rapidly in the unsanitary conditions.

Many people come to Kibera from rural areas to look for jobs in the city. A large proportion of the children have become orphans because so many adults have died from AIDS – many people in Kibera are infected with the HIV/AIDS virus.

A number of organisations work in the slum offering medical care, finding jobs and houses, and encouraging people to take part in sports and education. KIKOSHEP (Kibera Community Self-Help Program) provides care and advice for people with HIV/AIDS. They also have a youth centre where youngsters like Beatrice can go for health information and advice. The centre shows films and arranges sports and social events.

I first met Beatrice at the KIKOHEP primary school. Since then, she has graduated at the top of her class and is eligible to go on to secondary school. In Kibera, this is most children’s dream – they see education as the best way to escape from the slum.

But sadly, many girls are sent away by their families into arranged marriages or end up on the street as prostitutes, so they are never able to realise their dream.

The Kenyan Government and the United Nations have now started building new homes in Kibera so that they can move thousands of people out of the slum into better living conditions.

Reviews

You can’t help thinking how good it would be if Beatrice’s attitude to life could rub off on those of us who measure our poverty by the number of designer accessories we have, or the car we drive. It will also, no doubt, be popular with parents and teachers, for sharing with those who see school and parents as major impositions on their lives.

Armadillo Magazine||

Describes the life of Beatrice, a 13 year old orphan in Nairobi, Kenya, in an attractive book to enable children to identify with her.

Church Times||

Gives young readers an honest picture of the realities of life in one of the world's most difficult places. But Beatrice's appreciation of what she is offered at school and her ambitions for the future prevent it being downbeat.

School Librarian

Back cover copy

Beatrice is a thirteen-year-old orphan in Kibera, Nairobi – a Kenyan shantytown built on refuse and rubbish and one of the biggest slums in Africa. In this book she describes her life: her walk to school, the dust that blows between her teeth and the mud she wades through, her teacher’s down-to-earth encouragement, her fear of being alone, how safe

she feels at school... This sensitive account in words and photographs reveals the realities of life for some of the world’s most deprived people – and offers hope as Beatrice follows her dream.

Excerpt

In the afternoon, we learn about HIV and AIDS, and about ourselves. Our teacher asks, “What is special about girls?”

We answer, “Girls give birth and nurse children. They fetch firewood and water. They clean, cook and do the washing.”

“But can’t boys fetch wood and clean and cook and do the washing too?” my teacher asks.

Some of us agree with her.

Then she asks, “What can boys do that is special?”

We answer, “They build and repair houses, and provide for their families.”

“But can’t girls build houses and provide for their families too?””

“Yes, they can,” we answer.

“Boys and girls must all work together,” says my teacher. I like hearing her say this!