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Developing as a reflective early years professional: a thematic approach

Developing as a reflective early years professional: a thematic approach

Hayes, Carol (Lecturer in early childhood studies), author; Duncan, Mandy, author; Whitehouse, Ann, author; Gill, Ruth (Lecturer in early childhood studies), author; Daly, Jayne, author

An up to date and accessible text that takes a critical approach to key themes within the early years, with a focus on reflective practice. The early years sector is subject to constant government scrutiny and policy review. Sound reflective skills can empower practitioners at all levels and the sector as a whole to respond confidently to change. In addition, the introduction of the new Early Years Foundation Stage has enshrined within it the concept of reflective practice and the new Ofsted inspection schedule highlights the importance of self-evaluation and of being part of a reflective team. The text examines theories and research into the nature of reflective practice, how it can be used and how it can improve practice and produce a more responsive and thoughtful, research-based workforce for young children and their families. A range of themes, including global childhood poverty, observation and assessment, leadership, and multi-professional working, are then explored, highlighting the importance and application of reflection throughout these areas of research and practice

Book. English.
Published Northwich: Critical Publishing Ltd, 2014
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Details

Statement of responsibility: Carol Hayes, Jayne Daly, Mandy Duncan, Ruth Gill & Ann Whitehouse
ISBN: 1909682217, 9781909682214
Physical Description: x, 209 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Series: Early years.

Contents

  1. &#13
  2. What is Reflection?&#13
  3. Writing for Reflection&#13
  4. Critical Friends: the reflective facilitator&#13
  5. Reflecting on the Transition from Vocational Practice to University Study&#13
  6. Reflection Informed by Observation and Assessment&#13
  7. Emotionally Available Reflective Practice&#13
  8. Reflecting on Racism in Predominantly White Settings&#13
  9. Reflecting on Global Childhood Poverty &#13
  10. The Reflective Leader and Resourceful Manager&#13
  11. Reflecting on the Multi- professional Team&#13
  12. Reflection and Change &#13

Author note

Carol Hayes has worked in early years for the last 40 years as a teacher and tutor. She has worked at Staffordshire University for the last 6years as a principal lecturer and academic group leader. At Staffordshire University she has helped to develop a thriving early childhood studies department with programmes from Foundation Degrees to Masters in Early Childhood. Her specialist area is cognitive development, language, literacy and communication. She teaches the Reflective Practice module to the early childhood studies level 6 students. Her main research interests are dyslexia and communication difficulties and graduate teaching assistants in the workforce. 

Jayne Daly has worked in early years for the past 25 years as a nursery officer (NNEB), an early years manager and tutor. Throughout her professional practice she has worked within the public care, health and education sectors. Her current role came about after the realisation that she wanted to 'give something back' to those new to providing positive outcomes for young children and their families, and this passion pushed her forward into teaching within the higher education sector at Staffordshire University. She has worked as a lecturer in Early Childhood Studies for five and a half years, teaching from level 4 to 6. Her specialist areas are leadership and management, child development and safeguarding children, but she also has an interest in international perspectives in terms of curriculum development. 

Mandy Duncan began her career as a nursery nurse 15 years ago, before training as a teacher. She worked initially with young children in primary schools in both inner city and rural areas and later with young people aged 14-19 in a further education college. She has been a lecturer in higher education for the last four years teaching on BA (Hons) and MA Early Childhood Studies and BA (Hons) Childhood & Youth Studies. She is currently engaged in doctoral research with young people undergoing child protection proceedings.           

Ruth Gill's experience with children started as a children's nanny to bereaved families and progressed to working in a Further Education based nursery as an assistant. She quickly progressed to management but continued to study at HE level. Teaching in HE allows her to share her passion for quality interactions between staff and children with a wide audience of new and experienced practitioners.

Ann Whitehouse started her career as an NNEB and worked for a number of years in nursery education. More recently, she has worked as an Early Years lecturer in FE and played an integral role in developing a Foundation Degree in Early Years for experienced practitioners.  She is currently a Senior Lecturer at Staffordshire University, working with full-time and part-time students on Early Childhood Studies programmes and Award Leader for the Foundation Degree.  Her specific interests are related to the development of early years' pedagogy and her research involves listening to practitioners' experiences and views.  

Reviews

This book is excellent as the content puts reflection within the context of early years practice in a comprehensive way. The writing is accessible for undergraduate readers.

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The book will be a vital source to enable students to develop the ability to reflect on the practice and to support their persoanl and professional development for Employement within the sector.

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This book is easy to read, informative and provides clear guidance for students on how to be a reflective practitioner

Back cover copy

This up to date and accessible text takes a critical approach to key themes within the early years, with a focus on reflective practice.

The early years sector is one subject to constant government scrutiny and policy review. Sound reflective skills can empower practitioners at all levels and the sector as a whole to respond confidently to change. In addition, the introduction of the new Early Years Foundation Stage has enshrined within it the concept of reflective practice and the new Ofsted inspection schedule highlights the importance of self-evaluation and of being part of a reflective team.

The text starts by examining theories and research into the nature of reflective practice, how it can be used and how it can improve practice and produce a more responsive and thoughtful, research-based workforce for young children and their families. A range of themes, including global childhood poverty, observation and assessment, leadership, and multi-professional working, are then explored, highlighting the importance and application of reflection throughout these areas of research and practice.