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The legacy of Iraq: from the 2003 War to the 'Islamic State'

The legacy of Iraq: from the 2003 War to the 'Islamic State'

Isakhan, Benjamin, 1977- editor

"In March 2003, a US-led 'Coalition of the Willing' launched a pre-emptive intervention against Iraq. The nine long years of military occupation that followed saw an ambitious project to turn Iraq into a liberal democracy, underpinned by free-market capitalism and constituted by a citizen body free to live in peace and prosperity. However, the Iraq war did not go to plan and the coalition were forced to withdraw all combat troops at the end of 2011, having failed to deliver on their promise of a democratic, peaceful and prosperous Iraq. This text seeks not only to reflect on this abject failure but to put forth the argument that key decisions and errors of judgment on the part of the coalition and the Iraqi political elite set in train a sequence of events that have had devastating consequences for Iraq, for the region and for the world"--Provided by publisher

eBook, Hardback, Electronic resource, Book. English. Electronic books.
Published Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, [2015]
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Details

Statement of responsibility: edited by Benjamin Isakhan
ISBN: 0748696164, 0748696172, 1474405002, 9780748696161, 9780748696178, 9781474405003
EAN: 9780748696161
Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 236-270) and index.
Note: Print version record.
Physical Description: 1 online resource (x, 278 pages)
Other Number: 9780748696161
Subject: HISTORY Middle East General.; Irak; Iraq War (2003-2011); Iraq War, 2003-2011 Influence.; Politics and government.; Influence (Literary, artistic, etc.); United States Foreign relations Iraq.; Irakkriget 2003-; Minderheitenfrage; Islam och politik.; Islam and politics.; Innenpolitik; Democratization.; POLITICAL SCIENCE International Relations Arms Control.; Iraq Politics and government.; United States.; Democratization Iraq.; Islam and politics Iraq.; Regionalpolitik; Internationale Politik; Diplomatic relations.; Demokratisering.; Iraq.; Iraq Foreign relations United States.

Contents

  1. Part I. The aftermath of war : strategic decisions and catastrophic mistakes
  2. Part II. Iraqi politics since Saddam
  3. Part III. The plight of Iraqi culture and civil society
  4. Part IV. Regional and International consequences of the Iraq war.

Description for teachers

Politics; War Studies; Military History; International Relations; Middle Eastern Studies

Description for readers

Examines the complex and difficult legacies of the Iraq war of 2003 and their critical relevance today

In March 2003, a US-led 'Coalition of the Willing' launched a pre-emptive intervention against Iraq. Their ambitious project was to turn Iraq into a liberal democracy, underpinned by free-market capitalism, its citizens free to live in peace and prosperity. However, the Iraq war did not go to plan and the coalition were forced to withdraw all combat troops at the end of 2011, having failed to deliver on their promise of a democratic, peaceful and prosperous Iraq.

The Legacy of Iraq critically reflects on this abject failure and argues that mistakes made by the coalition and the Iraqi political elite set a sequence of events in motion that have had devastating consequences for Iraq, the Middle East and for the rest of the world. Today, as the nation faces perhaps its greatest challenge in the wake of the devastating advance of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and another US-led coalition undertakes renewed military action in Iraq, understanding the complex and difficult legacies of the 2003 war could not be more urgent. To ignore the legacies of the Iraq war and to deny their connection to contemporary events means that vital lessons could be ignored and the same mistakes made again.

Find out more

View the full notes on Contributors

Read and download the introduction, 'The Iraq Legacies - Intervention, Occupation, Withdrawal and Beyond', for free (pdf)

Back cover copy

A timely examination of the complex and difficult legacies of the Iraq war of 2003 and their critical relevance today

In March 2003, a US-led 'Coalition of the Willing' launched a pre-emptive intervention against Iraq. The nine long years of military occupation that followed saw an ambitious project to turn Iraq into a liberal democracy, underpinned by free-market capitalism and constituted by a citizen body free to live in peace and prosperity. However, the Iraq war did not go to plan and the coalition were forced to withdraw all combat troops at the end of 2011, having failed to deliver on their promise of a democratic, peaceful and prosperous Iraq. The Legacy of Iraq seeks to not only reflect on this abject failure but to put forth the argument that key decisions and errors of judgment on the part of the coalition and the Iraqi political elite set in train a sequence of events that have had devastating consequences for Iraq, for the region and for the world. Today, as the nation faces perhaps its greatest challenge in the wake of the devastating advance of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and another US-led coalition undertakes renewed military action in Iraq, understanding the complex and difficult legacies of the 2003 war could not be more urgent. To ignore the legacies of the Iraq war and to deny their connection to contemporary events means that vital lessons will be ignored and the same mistakes will be made.

Benjamin Isakhan is Australian Research Council Discovery (DECRA) Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation, and Convenor of the Middle East Studies Forum at Deakin University, Australia. He is the author of Democracy in Iraq: History, Politics, Discourse (2012) and the editor of five books including The Edinburgh Companion to the History of Democracy (Edinburgh University Press, 2012).