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History of the Opium problem: the assault on the East, ca. 1600-1950

History of the Opium problem: the assault on the East, ca. 1600-1950

Derks, Hans, 1938-

Covering a period of about four centuries, this book demonstrates the economic and political components of the opium problem. As a mass product, opium was introduced in India and Indonesia by the Dutch in the 17th century. China suffered the most, but was also the first to get rid of the opium problem around 1950

eBook, Electronic resource, Book. English. History. Electronic books.
Published Leiden ; Boston : Brill 2012

This resource is available electronically from the following locations

Details

Statement of responsibility: by Hans Derks
ISBN: 9004225897, 9789004221581, 9789004225893
Note: Malaysia (Melaka, Malacca) and Singapore.
Note: Print version record.
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: 1 online resource (xxvi, 824 pages) : illustrations, maps.
Series: Sinica Leidensia ; v. 105
Subject: Asia.; BUSINESS & ECONOMICS Infrastructure.; East and West.; Opium trade.; Imperialism Social aspects.; HISTORY / General; Opium trade Asia History.; Opium abuse Asia History.; Opium abuse.; SOCIAL SCIENCE General.
Series Title: Sinica Leidensia ; v. 105.
Local note: JSTOR Books at JSTOR Open Access

Contents

  1. PREFACE
  2. PREFACE
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Acknowledgements
  5. LIST of ILLUSTRATIONS, TABLES, FIGURES and MAPS
  6. LIST of ILLUSTRATIONS, TABLES, FIGURES and MAPS
  7. ILLUSTRATIONS
  8. PART ONE THE OPIUM PROBLEM
  9. INTRODUCTION
  10. THE POLITICS OF GUILT
  11. THE "ORIGINAL SIN"
  12. CONCLUSIONs
  13. PART TWO THE BRITISH ASSAULT
  14. the actual sins
  15. A Private English Asian Trading Company
  16. Opium on a List
  17. A Moral Question
  18. TEA FOR OPIUM Vice Versa
  19. An Analysis from Within
  20. The Bullion Game
  21. The Decision
  22. Opium Shipping
  23. Opium Smuggling
  24. Opium Corruption
  25. Religion as Opium
  26. Opium Banking in a Crown Colony
  27. Exorbitant Opium Revenues.
  28. On the Chinese SideINDIAN PROFITS
  29. Monopoly Opium Production
  30. Monopoly Smuggling
  31. A Western Competitor
  32. Narco-business Revenues
  33. THE INVENTION OF AN ENGLISH OPIUM PROBLEM
  34. Questions
  35. An English Home Market for Drugs
  36. The Creation of the English Opium Problem
  37. A FIRST REFLECTION
  38. PART THREE THE DUTCH ASSAULT
  39. PORTUGUESE LESSONS
  40. Portuguese Elite versus Portuguese Folk
  41. Arab Trade in Peace
  42. On the Malabar Coast
  43. What Did the Dutch Learn about Opium from the Portuguese?
  44. PEPPER FOR OPIUM VICE VERSA
  45. THE BENGAL SCENE
  46. The Dutch Connection
  47. Mughal Production and Consumption.
  48. THE "VIOLENT OPIUM COMPANY" (VOC) IN THE EASTA "Heart of Darkness" avant la lettre
  49. The Dutch Opium Image
  50. Laudanum Paracelsi
  51. The Sailor's Health
  52. The Asiatic Opium Image of the Dutch
  53. Double Dutch Violence
  54. Monopoly Wars
  55. Empire Building
  56. The Banda Case and all that
  57. Other 17th-century Violence
  58. Continuous Dutch Violence
  59. Dutch Opium Trade: General Questions
  60. The Indigenous Producers
  61. Opium Consumption in the East Indies
  62. THE AMPHIOEN SOCIETY AND THE END OF THE VOC
  63. A Brilliant Economist?
  64. The AS Performance
  65. THE CHINESE, THE VOC AND THE OPIUM
  66. Murder in Batavia
  67. Birth of a Chinese Hate?
  68. Chinese as VictimsChinese and Early Opium Trade
  69. FROM TRADE MONOPOLY INTO NARCO-STATE MONOPOLY
  70. A Transformation from Private into Public Interest
  71. The Four Van Hogendorps as Opium Dealers
  72. The Birth of a Narco-military State
  73. TIN FOR OPIUM, OPIUM FOR TIN?
  74. The Opium Business of Billiton
  75. PUBLIC ADVENTURES OF A PRIVATE STATE WITHIN THE STATE
  76. A Royal Opium Dealer
  77. The State within the (Colonial) State
  78. THE OPIUM REGIME OF THE DUTCH (COLONIAL) STATE,1850-1940
  79. The Outer Districts
  80. The Bali Case
  81. The Opiumregie
  82. The Dutch Cocaine Industry
  83. Legal Hypocrisy
  84. A Double Dutch End
  85. PROFITS.
  86. The Opium FarmerThe Colonial State as Farmer
  87. REFLECTIONS
  88. PART FOUR THE FRENCH ASSAULT
  89. OPIUM IN AND FOR LA DOUCE FRANCE
  90. Parisian Fumes
  91. The French Pharmaceutical Scene
  92. Drugs from abroad
  93. THE FRENCH COLONIAL SCENE IN SOUTHE AST ASIA
  94. The Beginning of a Disaster
  95. The French Opium Performance
  96. Revenue Farming
  97. The Opiumregie
  98. The French Concession in Shanghai
  99. The End of a Disaster
  100. THE SOUTHEAST ASIAN CONTEXT
  101. Introduction
  102. From "Golden Triangle" to "Bloody Quadrangle"
  103. The Tribal Scene
  104. The Shan State
  105. The Hmong tribe
  106. Consumption Pattern
  107. Myanmar (Burma)
  108. Thailand (Siam).