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Mixing methods: qualitative and quantitative research

Mixing methods: qualitative and quantitative research

Brannen, Julia, 1944-

This book focuses on a key issue in the methodology of the social and behavioural sciences: the mixing of different research methods. The extent to which qualitative and quantitative research differ from one another has long been a subject of debate. Although many methodologists have concluded that the two approaches are not mutually exclusive, there are few books on either the theory or the practice of mixing methods

Book. English.
Published Aldershot: Avebury, 1995

Available at All Saints.

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  • All Saints – Two available in 001.42/MIX

    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    16111974 001.42/MIX Two Week Lending Available
    13743899 001.42/MIX Two Week Lending Available

Details

Statement of responsibility: edited by Julia Brannen
ISBN: 1859721168, 9781859721162
Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Physical Description: xvi,175p ; 22 cm.
Subject: Research.

Contents

  1. Part 1 Considerations using multi-methods: combining qualitative and quantitative approaches - an overview, Julia Brannen
  2. deconstructing the qualitative-quantitative divide, Martyn Hammersley
  3. quantitative and qualitative research - further reflections on their integration, Alan Bryman. Part 2 Studies using multi-methods: the relationship between quantitative and qualitative approaches in social policy research, Roger Bullock, et al
  4. integrating methods in applied research in social policy - a case study of carers, Hazel Qureshi
  5. combining quantitative and qualitative methods - a case study of the implementation of the Open College policy, Margaret Bird
  6. multiple methods in the study of household resource allocation, Heather Laurie.