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The prince and the pauper

The prince and the pauper

Kennedy, Jemma, 1971- author; Twain, Mark, 1835-1910

Jemma Kennedy's stage adaptation of Mark Twain's novel is a dynamic and fast-paced narrative of confused identities. Set in Tudor London, the poverty-stricken Tom Canty has a chance meeting with the young heir to the throne, Prince Edward; by pure coincidence, they find they look almost identical. The play tells the story of what happens when one person is mistaken for the other and what happens to them in the long-term: Tom Canty is forced into the world of the court and power, while Edward is cast down into a world of poverty and thieves, from which he must fight his way back to the court. This adaptation was first produced in 2012 at the Unicorn Theatre

eBook, Electronic resource, Book. English.
Published London: Methuen Drama, 2012

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Details

Statement of responsibility: Jemma Kennedy ; based on the novel by Mark Twain
ISBN: 9781472515636
Note: Description based on print version record.
Physical Description: 1 online resource (95 pages)
Subject: Poor Drama.; Historical drama, English.; Princes England Drama.; Social role Drama.; Great Britain History Edward VI, 1547-1553 Drama.

Author note

Jemma Kennedy is a playwright, novelist and screenwriter. She was Pearson Playwright at the National Theatre in 2010/11 and became part of the inaugural Soho 6 writing scheme with the Soho Theatre Company in 2012.

Reviews

Perfectly timeless ... a postmodern morality tale
Telegraph||Remains as appealing for 21st-century children as it was for those who first read the novel on its publication in 1882 . Kennedy's sturdy adaptation, which cleverly plays up the fun of the role-swapping scenario and offers a bit of Tudor-style cross-dressing, Horrible Histories-esque jokes, and even an unlikely little spoof of Les Mis?rables . humour and intelligence prevail
Guardian||The children in the audience whooped and laughed
The Times||You can't fault this version of The Prince and the Pauper for originality . it is both fast and funny.
Stage