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Made in UK: xenophobic propaganda, treatment of "enemy aliens" in Britain prior and during WW1, and the Mackintosh 78 Derngate commission

Made in UK: xenophobic propaganda, treatment of "enemy aliens" in Britain prior and during WW1, and the Mackintosh 78 Derngate commission

Krasny, Tom; Bassett-Lowke, Wenman Joseph, 1877-1953; Floyer, Barbara; Mackintosh, Charles Rennie, 1868-1928; World War I (28 July 1914-11 November 1918)

Reviews the success of utilising craft activities, with a focus on woodwork, to relieve the suffering caused to civilians of German origin interned in the Knockaloe Camp on the Isle of Man by the British Government during the First World War. Uses the case of an order of commissioned furniture designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh for the home of Wenman Joseph Bassett-Lowke, to examine the challenges faced by these two individuals during the prevailing wartime atmosphere

Manuscript. English.
Published Glasgow: Glasgow School of Art, 2017

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    Barcode Shelfmark Loan type Status
    201899 Special Collection (Ask at Desk) 'Mackintosh'/KRA Reference Available

Details

Statement of responsibility: Tom Krasny
Note: Includes bibliography (pp. 32-34).
Physical Description: 34 pages : illustrations ; 30 cm.

Contents

  1. Chapter 1: 'Spy Fever': the prevailing atmosphere in Britain before the outbreak of the First World War and its effect on 'Enemy Aliens'; Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Wenman Joseph Bassett-Lowke of Northampton.
  2. Chapter 2: 'Old Knockaloe: the largest internment camp for civilian prisoners of war; the pacifist service work of the Friends Emergency and J T Bailey; the Mackintosh furniture commission.
  3. Chapter 3: Thoughts about de-humanisation and re-humanisation; a contemplation on Bassett-Lowke and Charles Rennie Mackintosh's motivation for involvement in the Knockaloe Commission, and an interview with Barbara Floyer, former archivist at the 78 Derngate Museum in Northampton