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Refracting the canon in contemporary British literature and film

Refracting the canon in contemporary British literature and film

Onega Jaén, Susana; Gutleben, Christian

Contemporary works of art that remodel the canon not only create complex, hybrid and plural products but also alter our perceptions and understanding of their source texts. This is the dual process, referred to in this volume as "refraction", that the essays collected here set out to discuss and analyse by focusing on the dialectic rapport between postmodernism and the canon. What is sought in many of the essays is a redefinition of postmodernist art and a re-examination of the canon in the light of contemporary epistemology. Given this dual process, this volume will be of value both to everyone interested in contemporary art-particularly fiction, drama and film-and also to readers whose aim it is to promote a better appreciation of canonical British literature

Book. English.
Published Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2004
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Details

Statement of responsibility: edited by Susana Onega and Christian Gutleben
ISBN: 9042010509, 9789042010505
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Physical Description: 261 p. ; 22 cm.
Series: Postmodern studies ; 35

Contents

  1. Christian GUTLEBEN and Susana ONEGA: Introduction
  2. 1. Catherine PESSO-MIQUEL: Clock-ridden Births: Creative Bastardy in Sterne's Tristram Shandyand Rushdie's Midnight's Children
  3. 2. Dietmar BOEHNKE: Double Refraction: Rewriting the Canon in Contemporary Scottish Literature
  4. 3. John A STOTESBURY: Genre and Islam in Recent Anglophone Romantic Fiction
  5. 4. Kirsten STIRLING: Dr Jekyll and Mr Jackass: Fight Club as a Refraction of Hogg's Justified Sinner and Stevenson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
  6. 5. Celestino DELEYTO ALCALÁ: Return to Austen: Film Heroines of the Nineties
  7. 6. Georges LETISSIER: Dickens and Post-Victorian Fiction
  8. 7. J. HILLIS MILLER: Parody as Revisionary Critique: Charles Palliser's The Quincunx
  9. 8. Margarida ESTEVES PEREIRA: Refracting the Past in Praise of the Dead Poets in Possession: A Romance
  10. 9. Jean-Michel GANTEAU: Hearts Object: Jeanette Winterson and the Ethics of Absolutist Romance
  11. 10. Fernando GALVÁN: Between Othello and Equiano: Caryl Phillips' Subversive Rewritings
  12. 11. Petra TOURNAY: Challenging Shakespeare: Strategies of Writing Back in Zadie Smith's White Teeth and Caryl Phillips' The Nature of Blood
  13. 12. Nicole BOIREAU: To Hamlet and back with Humble Boyby Charlotte Jones (2001)
  14. Notes on Contributors
  15. Index

Description

Contemporary works of art that remodel the canon not only create complex, hybrid and plural products but also alter our perceptions and understanding of their source texts. This is the dual process, referred to in this volume as "refraction", that the essays collected here set out to discuss and analyse by focusing on the dialectic rapport between postmodernism and the canon. What is sought in many of the essays is a redefinition of postmodernist art and a re-examination of the canon in the light of contemporary epistemology. Given this dual process, this volume will be of value both to everyone interested in contemporary art-particularly fiction, drama and film-and also to readers whose aim it is to promote a better appreciation of canonical British literature.