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How to study: and other skills for success in college

How to study: and other skills for success in college

Mundsack, Allan; Morgan, Clifford Thomas; Deese, Ellin K; Deese, James, 1921-1999

eBook, Electronic resource, Book. English. Electronic books.
5th ed.
Published New York: McGraw-Hill, ©2003

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Details

Statement of responsibility: Allan Mundsack, James Deese, Ellin K. Deese
ISBN: 0071406077, 007142590X, 9780071406079, 9780071425902
Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Note: Print version record.
Note: Revised edition of: How to study. 4th ed. / revised by James Deese, Ellin K. Deese.
Physical Description: 1 online resource (ix, 209 pages) : illustrations
Subject: Study skills.; EDUCATION Higher.; College student orientation United States.; College student orientation.; United States.
Local note: eBooks on EBSCOhost All EBSCO eBooks

Contents

  1. Getting Off to a Good Start
  2. The Art of Studying
  3. The Classroom Experience
  4. The Art of Reading
  5. Studying from Textbooks
  6. Taking Examinations
  7. Writing Papers
  8. Studying a Foreign Language
  9. Computers, Mathematics, and Science
  10. Getting Help.
  11. Cover
  12. Copyright
  13. Table of Contents
  14. Preface
  15. To the Student
  16. About The Authors
  17. Chapter 1 Getting Off to a Good Start
  18. WHY GO TO COLLEGE?
  19. EVALUATING YOUR PRIORITIES
  20. Rating Your Abilities
  21. What You Can Learn from Your Standardized Test Scores
  22. Self-Rating of Traits and Abilities
  23. How Motivated Are You?
  24. Are You Prepared for the Competition?
  25. Examining Alternatives
  26. WHAT TO EXPECT
  27. LIVING ARRANGEMENTS
  28. Living at Home
  29. Living in a Dormitory
  30. ORIENTATION AND ADVISING
  31. LEARNING TO COPE
  32. Academic Demands
  33. Social Pressures
  34. Parental Pressure
  35. Financial Pressures
  36. Being Involved
  37. Chapter 2 The Art of Studying
  38. IMPROVING MOTIVATION
  39. Motivation for College
  40. The Importance of Grades
  41. Satisfaction in Study
  42. Study Groups
  43. Technology
  44. Keeping an Open Mind
  45. Learning Modes
  46. DEVELOPING PERSONAL EFFICIENCY
  47. The Value of a Schedule
  48. A Sample Schedule
  49. Studying for Lecture Classes
  50. Studying for Mathematics and Language Classes
  51. Making a Schedule
  52. Blocking Out Your Study Time
  53. Revising a Schedule
  54. Using Time Effective
  55. Improving Your Ability to Concentrate
  56. How Good a Student Are You?
  57. STRENGTHENING BASIC SKILLS
  58. Identifying Your Weaknesses
  59. Correcting Your Weaknesses
  60. Chapter 3 The Classroom Experience
  61. HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF LECTURE COURSES
  62. Attending Discussion Sections
  63. Understanding How the Course Is Organized
  64. Improving Listening Skills
  65. Taking Good Lecture Notes
  66. Reviewing and Revising
  67. Keeping Lecture Notes
  68. The Five Rs of Taking Notes
  69. Illustration of Reduced Notes
  70. By Way of Caution
  71. Contributing to the Discussion
  72. Exchanging Ideas with Classmates
  73. HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF INDEPENDENT STUDY
  74. Planning Your Work
  75. Conferences with Your Faculty Adviser
  76. Preparing Your Paper or Final Report
  77. Some Tips about Independent Study
  78. A FINAL WORD
  79. Chapter 4 The Art of Reading
  80. READING FOR A PURPOSE
  81. Skimming
  82. Getting the Main Idea
  83. Analyzing Paragraphs
  84. Extracting Important Details
  85. Reading for Pleasure
  86. Evaluating What You Read
  87. Expanding What You Read
  88. USING YOUR EYES
  89. Eye Movements
  90. Improving Eye Movements
  91. HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR READING SKILLS
  92. Building a Vocabulary
  93. What You Can Learn from a Dictionary
  94. Common Prefixes, Suffixes, and Latin Roots
  95. Learning to Read Faster
  96. Chart for Increasing Reading Speed
  97. Chapter 5 Studying from Textbooks
  98. FIVE STEPS TO EFFECTIVE STUDY
  99. Survey
  100. Question
  101. The Use of Questions
  102. Read
  103. Recite
  104. Review
  105. UNDERLINING, HIGHLIGHTING, AND OUTLINING TEXTBOOKS
  106. Underlining and Highlighting
  107. Taking Reading Notes
  108. Methods of Outlining
  109. Underlining a Textbook
  110. Outlining from Books
  111. Content of Notes
  112. When Not to Outline
  113. Writing Summaries
  114. Taking Notes from History Texts
  115. Example o.

Author note

Allan Mundsack, M.A.is on the mathematics faculty at Los Angeles Pierce College and has spent 29 years teaching mathematics in the California State College system.